INT no evil, ABS no evil, DEV no evil – Flying Monkey TV

THE CODE PUBLISHED HERE COMES WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY WHATSOEVER, SO PLEASE USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

I am basing my code on existing bits of open source stuff scavenged from various places and cobbled together. At some point in the future I hope to make some sort of point-and-click front end for it, but in the meantime it’s just command-line code, and at the moment, pretty crude.

Here is a slightly updated version of my previous script, which now clears the work folders and downloads from the camera using gPhoto2.

# !/bin/bash
clear
echo “Hello Monkey world”
#gphoto2 —

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/newtest
rm *.JPG
rm *.jpg
cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp
rm *.JPG
rm *.jpg

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/newtest
gphoto2 –get-all-files

x=1; for i in $(ls -t -r *JPG); do counter=$(printf %04d $x); ln “$i” /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp/img_”$counter”.jpg; x=$(($x+1)); done

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp
ffmpeg -r 25 -i img_%04d.jpg -s 640×480 -qscale 1 -vcodec mjpeg movie.avi

This is pretty clunky but at least it’s getting somewhere. At some point I’ll find out how to reference files case-insensitive.

On some of the older cameras, such as my A620, the camera saves images in discrete folders of only 200 images each, which means a lot of effort in post-production if it has to be done by hand.

I think the next logical steps are to compile multiple folders of images and also to name the destination movie file discretely. The name could be created from some format information, a date/time stamp, and the model of the camera which can be derived from gPhoto2.

Googling something about recursive folders I found this:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/245698/list-files-recursively-in-linux-with-path-relative-to-the-current-directory

However, this does not return them in creation time order and, as far as I could google, there doesn’t seem to be an argument to produce that.

After googling something about Linux pipeline commands I found a reference to xargs, and Bob’s your uncle. I can hardly believe I found it so quickly, but I remember Martyn at Access Space telling me about pipelining so I used a bit of intuition and worked out how to take the results from the find command and sort them afterwards.

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/linux-unix-bsd-xargs-construct-argument-lists-utility/

Here is my Bride of Frankenstein, which takes a folder full of folders (full of images), lists them in creation order, renames them and compiles them into a movie file. Simples!

# !/bin/bash
clear
echo “Hello Monkey Planet”

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp
rm *.JPG
rm *.jpg

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/newtest

x=1; for i in $(find $(pwd) -name \*.JPG | xargs ls -t -r); do counter=$(printf %04d $x); ln “$i” /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp/img_”$counter”.jpg; x=$(($x+1)); done

cd /home/richard/Desktop/RBTest/testtemp
ffmpeg -r 25 -i img_%04d.jpg -s 640×480 -qscale 1 -vcodec mjpeg movie.avi

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: